Bethlehem Press

Sunday, January 19, 2020
PRESS PHOTOS BY CYNTHIA UNDERHILL 8425 Katie Anderson helps Bill Best, the program director, fill the blue teams water tower while her teamates Mindy Marinko , Sydney Utesch, Maanasi Gothoskar and Shannon Boyle watch. PRESS PHOTOS BY CYNTHIA UNDERHILL 8425 Katie Anderson helps Bill Best, the program director, fill the blue teams water tower while her teamates Mindy Marinko , Sydney Utesch, Maanasi Gothoskar and Shannon Boyle watch.
8443 Members of the Pink Team react as their water tower breaks from the weight. Teammates are Kayleigh Boyle, Grace Boak, Vanshi Singh, Brianna Cabassa, and a Elizabeth Hunsicker. 8443 Members of the Pink Team react as their water tower breaks from the weight. Teammates are Kayleigh Boyle, Grace Boak, Vanshi Singh, Brianna Cabassa, and a Elizabeth Hunsicker.
8427 Green Team members Alison Yurchak, Garcieia Rivera, Meghan Fickett, Nicolette Drescher, Mya Tucker, Nur Bookwala, and Elise Thren wait for water to be added to their water tower. 8427 Green Team members Alison Yurchak, Garcieia Rivera, Meghan Fickett, Nicolette Drescher, Mya Tucker, Nur Bookwala, and Elise Thren wait for water to be added to their water tower.
8452 or 8455 Bill Best, program director, talks with the teams about structural changes they would make to their water towers now that they have seen them break. 8452 or 8455 Bill Best, program director, talks with the teams about structural changes they would make to their water towers now that they have seen them break.
CHOICES encourages future female engineers CHOICES encourages future female engineers

CHOICES encourages future female engineers

Wednesday, September 26, 2012 by CYNTHIA UNDERHILL Special to the Bethlehem Press in School

The summer CHOICES Engineering Camp is a chance for women engineers from Lehigh University's P C. Rossin College of Engineering and Applied Science to share their interest and knowledge with middle school-aged girls. The camp took place in mid-July at Lehigh University.

Four teams participated in hands on experiments that introduced them to multiple science and engineering disciplines. For materials and science engineering, they assembled and tested fruit batteries. They built a burglar alarm for electrical engineering and developed new funny putty in chemical engineering. For computer engineering, they programmed a robot and for civil and environmental engineering, they purified muddy water.

On the last day of camp, family and friends were invited to watch two of the finished projects tested. They saw the Rube Goldberg Project where campers engineered a device that will automatically push a thumbtack into a piece of foam.

They also saw the water towers, built for structural engineering, filled with water to see how much they could hold. The campers discussed their designs before testing the towers. "The triangles are pointing in all different directions so no matter where the pressure comes from it will be supported," said Kayleigh Boyle about her team's water tower.

The girls watched as each water tower held a bucket that was slowly filled with water until it collapsed from the weight. Then Bill Best, the program director led a discussion about changes they would make to their towers now that they had seen the weak points. "I think we should have had support in the middle," suggested Elizabeth Hunsicker.

All of the projects combined fun with learning in hopes that some of these girls will one day become future engineers, as their T-shirts said.