Bethlehem Press

Sunday, October 22, 2017
PRESS PHOTO COURTESY TRADITIONS OF HANOVERJoan Steinberg and Valerie McCarthy man the registration table. Joan is a resident of Hanover Township and is an advocate for seniors her mother passed from vascular dementia so she understands the struggle of the disease. Valerie McCarthy is also a resident of the Township and came out to volunteer and help her community come together for an important PRESS PHOTO COURTESY TRADITIONS OF HANOVERJoan Steinberg and Valerie McCarthy man the registration table. Joan is a resident of Hanover Township and is an advocate for seniors her mother passed from vascular dementia so she understands the struggle of the disease. Valerie McCarthy is also a resident of the Township and came out to volunteer and help her community come together for an important

Event benefits Alzheimer’s Assoc.

Tuesday, September 13, 2016 by Contributed article in Local News

Traditions of Hanover residents, staff, friends and family came together, decked out in their purple attire, to raise over $7,100 for “The Longest Day,” an Alzheimer’s Association fundraiser.

The Longest Day is a team event to raise funds and awareness for the Alzheimer’s Association®. Held annually on the summer solstice, the duration of this sunrise-to-sunset event symbolizes the challenging journey of those living with the disease and their caregivers (thelongestday.alz.org).

“The Longest Day was a wonderful event to raise funds and awareness for the Alzheimer’s Association,” said Laurie Schwab, resident life and case management director. “We were supported by many volunteers within the community – residents, businesses, healthcare professionals, family members, and friends. It was very heartfelt to see everyone come together for such a worthy cause.”

Traditions of Hanover had many ways participants could donate, including dropping off a monetary donation, or visiting http://act.alz.org/goto/traditionsofhanover. They could also walk a lap around the Traditions of Hanover community for a donation of $1 per lap; buy a treat at the bake sale; or make a purchase at the Traditions of Hanover Sweet Pickings Country Store, where 10 percent of proceeds were donated to the Alzheimer’s Association.

Staff member Kathy Springer said, “The Longest Day is very important to me because my grandmother Katherine has late stage Alzheimer’s and she is a very important part of my life.” Kathy walked several laps around the building focusing on “Miles for Memory.”

Activities at Traditions of Hanover for the day included bingo and a beanbag toss, and there were sprinklers for the walkers to cool off on the warm summer day. The Hanover Township Community Center Kids Day Camps joined Traditions for walking, running through the sprinklers, and enjoying snacks and the hydration station with infused fruit on the back lawn.

“We supported The Longest Day because we know people suffering from Alzheimer’s,” said participants Kathy and Jack Hauler. “As people age, you see more and more how prevalent it is. We appreciated the community interaction and seeing our granddaughter and great-grandchildren being pushed in the stroller.”

Several businesses supported the event and provided free services during the day, including blood pressure checks with SouthEastern Home Care; pinch test to test the strength in your hands with Maintain Your Independence; and physical therapy timed “Up and Go” test with Fox Rehabilitation. Other businesses with representatives that attended were Bayada Nursing, Atria Senior Living, Senior Moves by Design, Phoebe Pathstones, Oasis Senior Advisors, Highmark, Arcadia Visiting Nurses, Home Sweet Home Care, Abington Manor Memory Care Village, Music Therapy Associates, and CarePatrol.

“We were honored to host such an important event at our community! This disease takes away the ability to stay independent, so we value the research that is done to stop this devastating disease. It was great seeing our neighbors and larger community come together and share the day. We can’t wait to participate again next year,” said Cathy Heimsoth, executive director.