Bethlehem Press

Monday, June 25, 2018
There are many opportunities for people to get involved, whether as sponsors, host families or volunteers. On Dec 4, an independent documentary film, “Amba Means Sing,” which follows the journeys of three children, Moses, Angel and Nina, was released in theaters and on demand. Produced by friends of the choir, filmmakers and Danielle Bernstein and Erin Bernhardt, profits will go to Music for Life There are many opportunities for people to get involved, whether as sponsors, host families or volunteers. On Dec 4, an independent documentary film, “Amba Means Sing,” which follows the journeys of three children, Moses, Angel and Nina, was released in theaters and on demand. Produced by friends of the choir, filmmakers and Danielle Bernstein and Erin Bernhardt, profits will go to Music for Life
The nearly nonstop 90-minute performance highlighted the children’s ability to sing and dance, without losing their breath or their smiles. The nearly nonstop 90-minute performance highlighted the children’s ability to sing and dance, without losing their breath or their smiles.
Young voices soar in simple, beautiful harmony. The choir has produced over eight CDs and a DVD, available for purchase through iTunes or AT https://africanchildrenschoir.com. Young voices soar in simple, beautiful harmony. The choir has produced over eight CDs and a DVD, available for purchase through iTunes or AT https://africanchildrenschoir.com.
PRESS PHOTO BY JOANNA IRELANDThe African Children’s Choir performds at First Presbyterian Church, Nov. 19, bringing their message of hope through song and dance. The choir’s repertoire included crowd favorites, “Amazing Grace” and “He’s Got the Whole World in His Hands.” PRESS PHOTO BY JOANNA IRELANDThe African Children’s Choir performds at First Presbyterian Church, Nov. 19, bringing their message of hope through song and dance. The choir’s repertoire included crowd favorites, “Amazing Grace” and “He’s Got the Whole World in His Hands.”
While all Ugandan children drum, boys especially learn to play them at a very young age. While all Ugandan children drum, boys especially learn to play them at a very young age.
This child is a member of one of the two choirs touring the United States this year. The children range in age from 8 to 10 and are all from Uganda. This child is a member of one of the two choirs touring the United States this year. The children range in age from 8 to 10 and are all from Uganda.
The toe-tapping rhythms of music and dance made it impossible for the audience not to move to the beat with these enthusiastic performers. The toe-tapping rhythms of music and dance made it impossible for the audience not to move to the beat with these enthusiastic performers.
These children are ambassadors for millions of youths in Africa; funds they raise during their tours contribute to the education of the children and help to support the fundraising organization, Music for Life. These children are ambassadors for millions of youths in Africa; funds they raise during their tours contribute to the education of the children and help to support the fundraising organization, Music for Life.
The children each share what they want to be when they grow up. Popular professions include medicine, law, public service, social work and education. Several young girls said they wanted to become nuns, and one young lady said she wanted to be a beautician. The organization has funded the educations of 54,000 children since its inception. The children each share what they want to be when they grow up. Popular professions include medicine, law, public service, social work and education. Several young girls said they wanted to become nuns, and one young lady said she wanted to be a beautician. The organization has funded the educations of 54,000 children since its inception.

A new generation of ChangeMakers for Africa

Monday, December 5, 2016 by Joanna Ireland Special to the Bethlehem Press in Local News

On a cold, snowy night in November, a group of 17 children from Uganda celebrated and shared their country and heritage through song, dance and drumming at the First Presbyterian Church in Bethlehem.

The group, changing three times into the colorful costumes of their country, filled the packed sanctuary with voices raised in joyful harmony, singing traditional Ugandan and Christian songs of praise. Few audience members could resist the toe-tapping rhythms and pure harmonies created by the smiling, energetic performers.

These children, ages 8-10, comprise one of two groups from the African Children’s Choir touring the United States and United Kingdom for 10 months to raise awareness and money to support primary and secondary education for students in Uganda, Rwanda, Nigeria, South Africa, South Sudan, Kenya and Ghana.

The group’s CEO, Ray Barnett, founded the choir in 1984 after hearing a broadcast publicizing the starvation and deaths of 150,000 children affected by the civil war in northern Uganda. Having visited the country several years earlier on a humanitarian trip, he wanted to reach out and help the children.

Moved by what he saw, he created a choir to show the Western world the youngsters’ beauty and innocence through music, hoping that the organization would provide a foundation to raise awareness of the children’s plight and raise money to provide them with a more sustainable future.

The organization is dedicated to helping Africa’s most vulnerable children today, so they can help Africa tomorrow.

Its mission statement says, “We generate hope, healing, and justice for the innocent and vulnerable children of Africa caught up in areas of conflict and crisis, to enable these children to become ChangeMakers in Africa.”

The organization does this by:

• Promoting the beauty, dignity, and unlimited ability of the African child around the world, being a voice for the millions of suffering children who cannot speak for themselves.

• Providing for their well being and quality education utilizing the transformative power of music.

• Instilling Christian principles through teaching and leading by example.

• Bringing relief and development to African nations in crisis.

(Source: www.africanchildrenschoir.com)