Bethlehem Press

Wednesday, July 26, 2017
Schoenersville road signal improvements: PennDOT plans to improve signalization along Schoenersville Road at these intersections. Schoenersville road signal improvements: PennDOT plans to improve signalization along Schoenersville Road at these intersections.
press photos by bernie o’hareHanover’s Board of Supervisors, L to R: Michael Prendeviille, Mark Tanczos, John Diacogiannis (Chair), Steve Salvesen and John Nagle. press photos by bernie o’hareHanover’s Board of Supervisors, L to R: Michael Prendeviille, Mark Tanczos, John Diacogiannis (Chair), Steve Salvesen and John Nagle.

Jaindl Boulevard may see more traffic

Tuesday, March 14, 2017 by Bernie O’Hare Special to the Bethlehem Press in Local News

After hearing Hanover Township resident Lorna Rossnagle complain about “extremely disruptive” truck traffic along Jaindl Boulevard, Hanover Township Supervisors on Feb. 28 heard that developer J.G. Petrucci is planning to build two more big boxes along the same road. Kevin Horvath, P.E., representing Petrucci, presented plans for what Petrucci prefers to call two flex warehouses (99,000 square feet and 94,300 square feet). Horvath said they would be 70 percent warehouse and 30 percent light industrial. Supervisors unanimously agreed to consolidate three tracts into one 16.3 acre lot, but the development itself is only in the initial stages.

Horvath said no tenants have been identified.

Traditions of America residents expressed concerns about the noise from truck traffic that already exists along Jaindl Boulevard, which is made worse when trucks go over storm drains. In addition to noise, they are concerned that the larger building will seem higher because it will be built along a higher elevation. The berm in that area is only two feet high and will do little to reduce noise, they observed.

Steve Salvesen said supervisors will consider these concerns as development progresses, but township Manager Jay Finnigan warned that if the plan submitted complies with local ordinances, there is little that can be done. “It is what it is,” he cautioned.

Township engineer Brien R. Kocher later explained that there are sumps at curbs, and if a truck goes into them, it’s going to make a loud noise. Finnigan told supervisors that there’s a perception that a large truck is going faster than it actually is. He said he sometimes will get complaints about township-owned trucks driving at high rates of speed when GPS shows they are under the speed limit. A truck inspection officer regularly patrols the area.

In other business, supervisors and residents alike heard from PennDOT on 11 intersection improvements along a 1.84 mile stretch of Schoenersville Road, between Eighth Avenue and Stoke Park Road, planned for next spring. According to a study performed by the Lehigh Valley Planning Commission, “Improvements to traffic signals can yield a low cost/high benefit impact. Updating or modernizing signal components or entire signal heads can reduce congestion, improve safety, improve mobility by reducing the overall number of vehicle stops thus decreasing delay, and reduce fuel consumption and the associated negative impact to air quality.”

In a less controversial matter, supervisors voted to approve a conditional use application by Lehigh Valley Academy for an expansion of their school at 1650 Valley Center Parkway.

Michael Prendeville also reported to fellow supervisors on a recent visit he had with Bethlehem Area Public Library, in which Hanover Township is a participant. “It’s a very difficult industry to be in,” he said, explaining that advancing technology presents challenges to a library. He said one thing the library does, and does very well, is provide services to children. This includes homework assistance. In order to promote membership and usage by Hanover township residents, he will be donating money to the library for a raffle of Kindles to new township users.