Bethlehem Press

Thursday, September 21, 2017
Moravian College invited members of the local media to tour the new building last month as the interior structures were being completed. The massive hall on the first floor opens to a number of classrooms and larger teaching areas Moravian College invited members of the local media to tour the new building last month as the interior structures were being completed. The massive hall on the first floor opens to a number of classrooms and larger teaching areas
Vice President fo Institutional Advancement Gary Carney describes the workings of the high-tech cadaver lab. Rather than use real cadavers, the lab will have a $250,000 table-sized tablet device students will be able to use to examine body structures and organs using an interactive digital archive. Vice President fo Institutional Advancement Gary Carney describes the workings of the high-tech cadaver lab. Rather than use real cadavers, the lab will have a $250,000 table-sized tablet device students will be able to use to examine body structures and organs using an interactive digital archive.
From the third floor you can see the building is wedge-shaped, making it seem more spacious on the inside than it appears from outside. The cutaway section and stairways will be surrounded by glass banisters, keeping the entire space well lighted and airy-feeling. From the third floor you can see the building is wedge-shaped, making it seem more spacious on the inside than it appears from outside. The cutaway section and stairways will be surrounded by glass banisters, keeping the entire space well lighted and airy-feeling.
Moravian President Bryon Grigsby says operating rooms, ICUs and practice areas will be home to advanced robots capable of simulating everything from sweating to heart attacks to childbirth. He said practicing procedures in complete safety away from real patients will help students develop professional skills before they are faced with the real thing. Moravian President Bryon Grigsby says operating rooms, ICUs and practice areas will be home to advanced robots capable of simulating everything from sweating to heart attacks to childbirth. He said practicing procedures in complete safety away from real patients will help students develop professional skills before they are faced with the real thing.
PRESS PHOTOS BY NATE JASTRZEMSKIWorkers secure the glass atrium atop the corner of the health sciences building. The tower features a furnished study area on each floor, the top unofficially called the No-Shoes Lounge, from which the light of an eight-foot, 500-pound glass Moravian star will shine. PRESS PHOTOS BY NATE JASTRZEMSKIWorkers secure the glass atrium atop the corner of the health sciences building. The tower features a furnished study area on each floor, the top unofficially called the No-Shoes Lounge, from which the light of an eight-foot, 500-pound glass Moravian star will shine.

Media tours Moravian’s new high-tech health sciences building

Thursday, May 18, 2017 by Nate Jastrzemski njastrzemski@tnonline.com in Local News

Anyone passing Moravian College’s main campus has noticed the quick rise of a huge new building. Celebrating the near-completion of the Sally Breidegam Maiksiewicz Center for Health Sciences April 13, the college invited media to take a tour before the $23 million facility opens in June.

The interior was still pretty rough and workers were busy all over the building, but Vice President for Institutional Advancement Gary Carney described the small 275-year-old institution’s newest addition as ultra-modern and sized to allow the already lauded nursing program to grow by 25 percent more students.

The school is seeing a larger waiting list each year for the nursing program. President Bryon Grigsby said, “The program has 100 percent employment [after graduation], and parents tend to want their children employed.”