Bethlehem Press

Sunday, September 24, 2017
PRESS PHOTOS BY BERNIE O’HARE 1292 - Senator Pat Toomey was sympathetic to the plight of Dreamers, the name used for undocumented immigrants who came here as children. PRESS PHOTOS BY BERNIE O’HARE 1292 - Senator Pat Toomey was sympathetic to the plight of Dreamers, the name used for undocumented immigrants who came here as children.
1330 - Senator Pat Toomey responds to reporter’s question after the town hall at PBS 39 at Steelstacks in South Bethlehem. 1330 - Senator Pat Toomey responds to reporter’s question after the town hall at PBS 39 at Steelstacks in South Bethlehem.
1326 - Exactly 54 people participated in the town hall, which was broadcast statewide. 1326 - Exactly 54 people participated in the town hall, which was broadcast statewide.
1309 -Jude Denis of POWER Northeast (center) helped organize the town hall protest outide the PBS 39 studios in South Bethlehem. 1309 -Jude Denis of POWER Northeast (center) helped organize the town hall protest outide the PBS 39 studios in South Bethlehem.
1286 – Twenty-three police officers and Bethlehem Poilice Chief Mark DiLuzio were on hand ... just in case. 1286 – Twenty-three police officers and Bethlehem Poilice Chief Mark DiLuzio were on hand ... just in case.

Article By: BERNIE O’HARE Special to the Bethlehem Press

Tuesday, September 5, 2017 by BERNIE O’HARE Special to the Bethlehem Press in Local News

PBS 39 TOWN HALL - Toomey on Obamacare: ‘Not OK to just tear it up’

Fairly or unfairly, U.S. Senator Pat Toomey (R-Pa) has come under heavy criticism for refusing to meet his constituents at one of those increasingly raucous town halls. One group calling itself Tuesdays with Toomey actually camps outside his legislative offices weekly. Last night, it was Thursday with Toomey. It was a one-hour televised town hall at the Steelstacks’ PBS-39 Studios before a small crowd of 54 people and nine reporters and photographers.

Before things got started, about 35 protesters rallied outside the PBS studios. Many of them were Dreamers, the name used for undocumented immigrants who came here as children. Under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, as many as 800,000 dreamers have been granted a reprieve. Donald Trump could end that program as early as today, but Senator Toomey said at the end of his town hall that “we should find a way” to help this group. Toomey opposed President Obama’s decision to act by Executive Order. But Toomey said he would support legislation to help undocumented immigrants who came here as children.

In addition to these protesters, 23 uniformed police officers were on hand, along with Chief Mark DiLuzio. The chief explained that several different groups might come. This includes the Tea Party. They had demonstrated at a Toomey fundraiser the previous week.

“We’re here to keep the peace and protect everybody’s right to assemble and be heard,” DiLuzio said.

No other groups came, so there were no confrontations.

Fake town hall

Two participants told Toomey he was conducting a “fake” town hall. It certainly lacked the shouting and catcalls that Lehigh Valley Congressman Charlie Dent endured several months ago at a 500-person town hall in Hanover Township. But it was quite informative, thanks to PBS-39’s Laura McHugh and Brittany Garzillo. McHugh warned the audience, who had green cards with questions that were kept from Toomey, that their mikes would go dead if they went on for more than 30 seconds. She even told the senator himself to be more succinct at one point, and both audience and Toomey started to laugh.

Though there was only a small audience inside the room, the event was broadcast statewide. It was also livestreamed at several media sites. The Morning Call had 400 questions through social media. The audience groaned when Toomey insisted he’s conducted 75 town halls since being elected to the Senate because, as he himself acknowledged, they were mostly telephone town halls. But he explained that at larger and more rowdy settings, “there are some people who want to have a disruptive event.” He said “the important thing is to have an ongoing dialogue.” He added that he sometimes does meet with protesters visiting his field offices.

Obamacare

PBS-39’s McHugh, who acted as moderator, said the largest number of questions received concerned Obamacare.

Toomey assured a participant that her developmentally disabled son would still be covered under any of the competing replacements to Obamacare. “Fundamentally, Obamacare has failed,” he said. He noted that premiums have gone up 120% since enactment, and that 40 percent of Pennsylvanians now have only one insurer.

“This is not the way it’s supposed to work,” he said.

He said that the problem is that Obamacare has created a new category of Medicaid for young able-bodied people. The reforms being considered “would have no impact on the persons for whom Medicaid was created.”

Whatever happens, Toomey said there should be a “smooth transition. ... It is not OK to just tear it all up.”

Russian election interference

Toomey clearly stated that Russia attempted to interfere in the last presidential election. He believes Vladimir Putin is attempting to discredit western democracy.

“That would be a big victory for him,” he noted.

He supports the federal investigation of the Russian interference.

“Take this wherever it leads,” he said, even though some news accounts indicate that members of Donald Trump’s campaign team met with the Russians.

“Vladimir Putin is not a good guy,” asserted Toomey. “He is not a friend of the U.S.”

Charlottesville

Toomey was highly critical of the way President Trump responded to Carlottesville. There, a weekend of violence from white supremacists, neoNazis and the KKK led to the death of Heather Heyer, a counterprotester.

“I think the president really missed an important moment at Charlottesville,” Toomey said. Trump could have responded with “moral clarity,” Toomey said, but instead said there were “very fine people” on both sides. He called Trump’s statement “outrageous” and “unacceptable.” He said good people would never mix with white supremacists.

Minimum wage

Toomey opposes increasing the minimum wage to $15, which has been proposed by some Democrats. He said you can’t make people richer by “waving a wand.” He asked, “Why not $50?” He said an increase in the minimum wage would just put people out of work.

“I don’t want to be in the business of losing jobs,” he reasoned.

He acknowledged that persons who are paid minimum wages are unable to sustain themselves, but said that is why there are various federal programs for people with limited incomes.

One person ejected

Though the town hall was much more polite than the norm, participants groaned again when Toomey said that Trump has made great cabinet picks. He was offended when a former waiter at one of his sports bars asserted that he voted for Betsy DeVos as Education Secretary. in exchange for about $55,000 in political contributions over the years.

“That’s a character attack you have no basis for,” snapped Toomey. He went on to explain that a senate race costs $15 million, and said he was unaware of these contributions until recently.

Toomey said he supported DeVos because of her work on the expansion of charter schools and school choice, which he said insures that “poor kids” trapped in failing schools have the same opportunities that wealthy and middle class kids already have.

Simon Radecki was ejected after asking Toomey if he knew that his daughter had been kidnapped. Radecki was trying to make a point about immigration,

Harvey

Calling Hurricane Harvey a “staggering disaster of epic proportions,” Toomey said. “We will pull together and all we can to help.” He speculated that Harvey will probably be linked to an increase in the debt limit and a continuing resolution to keep the government funded.

After the town hall, Toomey was reminded that he voted against relief after Hurricane Sandy. He said that was because it became a pork project for senators and congressmen that had nothing to do with relief.

Additional Town Halls

PBS-39 said there will be additional town halls hosting Senator Bob Casey, and Congress members Charlie Dent and Matt Cartwright.