Bethlehem Press

Friday, November 16, 2018
Senior Katja Magyarics holds a box of pins for participants. Senior Katja Magyarics holds a box of pins for participants.
Students fill the quarter mile track around Liberty’s football field. A policeman estimated the crowd’s size at 75 percent of enrollment. The principal put the number at 2,000. Students fill the quarter mile track around Liberty’s football field. A policeman estimated the crowd’s size at 75 percent of enrollment. The principal put the number at 2,000.
7951. As friends walked around the track with friends, the atmosphere was friendly but much quieter than usual. 7951. As friends walked around the track with friends, the atmosphere was friendly but much quieter than usual.
Many students came with hand-made signs bearing messages for the public. Dustin Eillaneuda (foreground) used blood-red ink to make his point. Many students came with hand-made signs bearing messages for the public. Dustin Eillaneuda (foreground) used blood-red ink to make his point.
Three friends’ signs leave no doubt about where they put responsibility for the Florida massacre. Three friends’ signs leave no doubt about where they put responsibility for the Florida massacre.
Many signs express a feeling of vulnerability among the students. Many signs express a feeling of vulnerability among the students.
Signs express determination to reform gun laws. Signs express determination to reform gun laws.
Liberty bagpipers play “Amazing Grace.” Although they were surrounded by thousands of high school kids on a football field, the only other sound was the wind. Liberty bagpipers play “Amazing Grace.” Although they were surrounded by thousands of high school kids on a football field, the only other sound was the wind.
As the name of each Parkland, Florida, victim is read aloud, a balloon is released in honor of the individual. As the name of each Parkland, Florida, victim is read aloud, a balloon is released in honor of the individual.
A final plea as the crowd begins returning the class. A final plea as the crowd begins returning the class.
Beth McFadden, an art teacher, wanted her students to know she supports them. Beth McFadden, an art teacher, wanted her students to know she supports them.
Members of the community also came out to express support. Members of the community also came out to express support.
press photos by dennis glewLiberty Principal Harrison Bailey III (far left)watches as students surge onto the school’s track, picking up memorial pins on the way. press photos by dennis glewLiberty Principal Harrison Bailey III (far left)watches as students surge onto the school’s track, picking up memorial pins on the way.

‘You shouldn’t have to be doing this’

Monday, March 19, 2018 by Dorothy Glew Special to the Bethlehem Press in Local News

Remembering victims;

The United States is no stranger to mass protest marches. One need only think of all the marches against the Vietnam War, the Women’s marches in Washington, The Million Man March to unite the black community, the annual March for Life, and countless others. But the nationwide marches that took place March 14 were different: participants were primarily high school students.

In the wake of yet another school shooting, this one at Marjory Stoneman Douglas HS a month ago, students in nearly 3,000 schools across the nation left their classrooms to send the nation a message.

At Liberty HS, participation in the March was optional, so there was no way of knowing how many students would take part. Shortly before 10 a.m., students began pouring out of the building and kept on coming. By the time they were all assembled, the track surrounding Liberty’s football field was filled with students. In the center of the field, the brief program in memory of the victims of the shooting was conducted by students.

For this reporter, seeing this crowd of teenagers, some grim-faced and others carrying signs demanding that meaningful action be taken, made me painfully aware of the vulnerability of these young people because of our failure to protect them, and the realization moved me to tears. I turned to the student who had handed out ribbons to her fellow students and said, “You shouldn’t have to be doing this.”

On the positive side, I came away with the feeling that the tide is turning. I have the sense that more and more people are realizing that we need to enact much tighter gun regulations. After seeing and hearing high schoolers responding to the latest mass shooting, I think that if adults fail to take the necessary action, young people will.