Bethlehem Press

Thursday, June 21, 2018
PRESS PHOTO BY LORI PATRICKThe congregation reads along the Passover Trilogy Messianic Haggadah while members and guests recite segments from each table under the leadership of Rabbi Mark Shulman. Green Pond Country Club hosted the event of over 180 people. PRESS PHOTO BY LORI PATRICKThe congregation reads along the Passover Trilogy Messianic Haggadah while members and guests recite segments from each table under the leadership of Rabbi Mark Shulman. Green Pond Country Club hosted the event of over 180 people.
After the seder plate was observed and the reading of the Messianic Haggadah, members and guest enjoye a buffet dinner of beef in hunter sauce, salmon, lemon chicken, potatoes and vegetables. After dinner, Rabbi Mark Shulman finished the reading and the final cup of ‘wine’. After the seder plate was observed and the reading of the Messianic Haggadah, members and guest enjoye a buffet dinner of beef in hunter sauce, salmon, lemon chicken, potatoes and vegetables. After dinner, Rabbi Mark Shulman finished the reading and the final cup of ‘wine’.
A highlight of the Passover seder meal is the singing of Ma Nishtanah, ‘The Four Questions,’ by the children members of Beth El Gibor Messianic Jewish Congregation. A highlight of the Passover seder meal is the singing of Ma Nishtanah, ‘The Four Questions,’ by the children members of Beth El Gibor Messianic Jewish Congregation.
Passover 4: The Passover Seder Meal, in its13th year had its biggest attendance so far. Passover 4: The Passover Seder Meal, in its13th year had its biggest attendance so far.
The passing of the seder plate begins with a tasting of parsley called karpas in Hebrew, dipped in salt water and eaten as a symbol of the initial flourishing of the Israelites during the first years in Egypt. Here Pastor Fred Garnes and wife Anita Barnes of Allentown follow the Passover ritual to prepare the karpas, which they will dip twice in the salt water before consuming. The passing of the seder plate begins with a tasting of parsley called karpas in Hebrew, dipped in salt water and eaten as a symbol of the initial flourishing of the Israelites during the first years in Egypt. Here Pastor Fred Garnes and wife Anita Barnes of Allentown follow the Passover ritual to prepare the karpas, which they will dip twice in the salt water before consuming.
The Passover observance for the congregation of Beth El Gibor Messianic Jewish Congregation begins with Rabbi Mark Shulman holding the first cup of four glasses of wine (grape juice) as an important ritual of the seder. Every time throughout the reading of the Haggadah a cup is represented, the congregation must fill their glass to the top as a symbol of joy. The Passover observance for the congregation of Beth El Gibor Messianic Jewish Congregation begins with Rabbi Mark Shulman holding the first cup of four glasses of wine (grape juice) as an important ritual of the seder. Every time throughout the reading of the Haggadah a cup is represented, the congregation must fill their glass to the top as a symbol of joy.

Beth El Gibor Messianic Jewish Congregation

Tuesday, April 17, 2018 by Lori Patrick Special to the Bethlehem Press in Local News

Passover meal enjoyable, meaningful

In observance of Passover (Pesach) and Fast of the Firstborn also known as the Festival of Unleavened Bread, Beth El Gibor Messianic Jewish Congregation and guests of different faiths (gentiles) partook in a seder, which means ‘order’ of the plate and wine, March 31.

Rabbi Mark Shulman led the festival with the reading of Passover Trilogy Messianic Haggadah (study book). During the Haggadah, certain tastings take place within the scripture and lessons throughout. Members and guests were instructed when to pass the plate for each entry or when to fill their wine glass for the next drink of the ‘four cups.’ The congregation utilized grape juice, which is common in large gatherings. Most times in private homes observing a Passover seder, a red wine is used.

On the seder plate you can expect ‘maror’ (bitter herbs), such as parsley which is dipped into salt water, and pure horseradish as a remembrance of the bitterness and harshness of the slavery the Hebrews endured in Egypt. Some other items include a shank bone of lamb (zeroa), symbolizing the korban Pesach sacrifice, and a sweet paste called “haroset.” Matzo bread has high significance as it represents the exodus of Israelites from Egypt and was a food source to get them through, as they could not wait for bread to rise. The matzo could be baked unleavened and would sustain those on this journey.

Rabbi Shulman led the congregation and guests through the festival with dry humor and also a seriousness about the meaning of Passover, making the experience enjoyable and meaningful.

Children were invited to gather and sing the Ma Nishtanah while helpers held cards with the words for them, a very sweet moment. After the rituals were over the guests and congregation enjoyed a buffet dinner hosted by Green Pond Country Club. Rabbi Shulman went from table to table during dinner to greet people and engage in conversation.

Shulman said there were around 180 guests, the highest count in the 13 years of the annual seder meal.

After coffee and dessert were served, the final readings and the fourth cup of ‘wine’ were introduced.

You can visit Beth El Gibor at 1555 Linwood St, Bethlehem, where Rabbi Shulman and the congregation invite members of the Jewish community as well as gentiles.