Bethlehem Press

Sunday, September 23, 2018
Jennifer Rowe Hawk seeks advice from HARB on non-skid treatments for the wooden steps at her residence at 450 High St. Copyright - © Ed Courrier Jennifer Rowe Hawk seeks advice from HARB on non-skid treatments for the wooden steps at her residence at 450 High St. Copyright - © Ed Courrier
Brett Biggs and Seth Cornish seek a COA for proposed lighting for the courtyard adjacent to the Sun Inn at 564 Main St. Copyright - © Ed Courrier Brett Biggs and Seth Cornish seek a COA for proposed lighting for the courtyard adjacent to the Sun Inn at 564 Main St. Copyright - © Ed Courrier
PRESS PHOTOS BY ED COURRIERBruce Campbell presents his proposed façade renovations for a detached building behind 241 E. Market St. to HARB board members, from left, Connie Postupack , Diana Hodgson, Connie Glagola, historic officer George Donovan, Chairman Fred Bonsall, Marsha Fritz, and Vice Chair Philip Roeder. Copyright - © Ed Courrier PRESS PHOTOS BY ED COURRIERBruce Campbell presents his proposed façade renovations for a detached building behind 241 E. Market St. to HARB board members, from left, Connie Postupack , Diana Hodgson, Connie Glagola, historic officer George Donovan, Chairman Fred Bonsall, Marsha Fritz, and Vice Chair Philip Roeder. Copyright - © Ed Courrier
Staci Hangey fields questions from HARB regarding her proposed signage for “Advanced Communication Technologies (ACT)” for 7 E. Church St. Copyright - © Ed Courrier Staci Hangey fields questions from HARB regarding her proposed signage for “Advanced Communication Technologies (ACT)” for 7 E. Church St. Copyright - © Ed Courrier

Christmas City Spirits light up meeting

Thursday, May 31, 2018 by Ed Courrier Special to the Bethlehem Press in Local News

Christmas City Spirits, represented by Seth Cornish and Brett Biggs, was granted a certificate of appropriateness for proposed lighting for the courtyard adjacent to the venerable Sun Inn at 564 Main St. by the Historical and Architectural Review Board. Cornish’s proposal was turned down the previous month, but found success when he returned to the Rotunda May 2 with highly detailed plans for the project. Three black lantern style fixtures are to be installed on posts, with smaller LED string lighting suspended from airplane cables zigzagging above the North Green. The iconic stone building is owned by the Sun Inn Preservation Association

Maryanne Young achieved board approval for a hanging sign for her gift shop at 458 Main St. The 28-inch by 36-inch, double-sided, carved PVC panel reads, “Young’s Magasin de Quarter.” The COA allows the applicant to choose beige or gold lettering and pinstripe on a dark green, dark brown or black background. The sign is to be suspended from an existing bracket. The building is owned by Peter and Constance LoBaido.

HARB agreed with Staci Hangey’s proposal for a corporate sign using existing mounting holes for her business at 7 E. Church St. The 15-inch by 24-inch shaped placard sporting the company logo for “Advanced Communication Technologies (ACT)” in dark green letters and pinstripe with gray and lighter green icons on a tan background would be flush mounted to the brick wall.

Board member Genevieve Marcon recused herself for this application as she is the building’s owner.

Jennifer Rowe Hawk received approval by the board to replace her front porch “in-kind” for her residence at 450 High St. and change the color for the porch floor to a warm gray and door to a dark green. Hawk sought advice on non-skid treatments for her wooden steps. Board members recommended having an aggregate mixed in with the paint, then making sure it gets stirred constantly while applying it to the wood.

HARB gave the okay for Bruce Campbell’s plans to remove a large garage door from a former carriage house located at the rear of 241 E. Market St. and replace it with three windows and siding to match existing siding. The structure had been previously approved for new roofing and is being converted into a two-bedroom residential unit. Marsha Fritz asked about the unusual domed object at the top and was informed by Campbell that it was an observatory “for stargazing.” When asked if there was a telescope in there, he replied, “Someone swiped it, I believe.” The property is owned by Campbell Real Estate.

A certificate of appropriateness was granted to Jeff Youst’s proposed new driveway and five-car parking pad for tenants for his Manor House Apartments at 105 E. Market St. Red concrete pavers are to be used for the driveway and short connecting sidewalk. The parking area would be asphalt. Fencing would be employed to screen the parking lot with a pair of red brick piers, topped by bronze post lanterns. The piers would support framed wood vertical pickets that are painted to match the house.

Permission was granted for a similar fence along the eastern property line to screen the parking lot from a neighboring house. HARB had tabled Youst’s original application in September 2017.

Youst’s existing yard sign advertising his apartment building with phone number and email address didn’t pass muster because it resembled a real estate “for sale” sign. Marsha Fritz suggested installing a placard that read “Manor House Apartments” on the shorter screening fence. Youst was advised to return at a later time for signage approval.

When Youst asked about a mature tree on his berm that is adjacent to where the driveway access would be located, Vice Chairman Philip Roeder advised he contact the city forester.

223 E. Church St. was issued a COA for the replacement of existing slates from the west portion of the roof with Antique Slate GAF Slateline shingles and the installation of lead coated copper flashings around the chimney. Since this was the third phase of a previously approved project, Vice Chairman Philip Roeder told fellow members that owner Susan Parks and her contractor, Kovacs Roofing, did not need to be present at the meeting.

The Historical and Architectural Review Board meets the first Wednesday of every month to review all exterior changes proposed to buildings in the Bethlehem Historic District north of the Lehigh River. When a proposed project receives a certificate of appropriateness from the board, applicants must wait for City Council to vote on it before proceeding.