Bethlehem Press

Thursday, December 13, 2018
press photos by ed courrierAt right, Wilfredo Ramos, representing 266 E. Wall St., is instructed to return with revised plans for a more historically appropriate balustrade instead of the modern-looking deck balustrade originally proposed for the rear addition of the corner property. Copyright - © Ed Courrier press photos by ed courrierAt right, Wilfredo Ramos, representing 266 E. Wall St., is instructed to return with revised plans for a more historically appropriate balustrade instead of the modern-looking deck balustrade originally proposed for the rear addition of the corner property. Copyright - © Ed Courrier
Stephen Pallone seeks approval to replace the failing “ribbon slate” roofing with GAF Slateline shingles for the brick home he owns at 225 E. Wall St. Copyright - © Ed Courrier Stephen Pallone seeks approval to replace the failing “ribbon slate” roofing with GAF Slateline shingles for the brick home he owns at 225 E. Wall St. Copyright - © Ed Courrier
Sign maker David delos Stantos and SS 77 Hair Studio owner Selines Santiago field questions about their proposed replacement awning for 77 W. Broad St. Copyright - © Ed Courrier Sign maker David delos Stantos and SS 77 Hair Studio owner Selines Santiago field questions about their proposed replacement awning for 77 W. Broad St. Copyright - © Ed Courrier
Will Carpenter presents his case to HARB to remove an unused, barely visible brick chimney at the two-unit row home he owns at 224 E. Wall St. Copyright - © Ed Courrier Will Carpenter presents his case to HARB to remove an unused, barely visible brick chimney at the two-unit row home he owns at 224 E. Wall St. Copyright - © Ed Courrier
Kofi Armah and Jomana Hanna discuss their signage proposal for COAL Lounge & Grill at 81 W. Broad St. Copyright - © Ed Courrier Kofi Armah and Jomana Hanna discuss their signage proposal for COAL Lounge & Grill at 81 W. Broad St. Copyright - © Ed Courrier
Diana Hodgson holds up a copy of the proposed blade sign for 81 W. Broad St. Copyright - © Ed Courrier Diana Hodgson holds up a copy of the proposed blade sign for 81 W. Broad St. Copyright - © Ed Courrier
Contractor Ben Maderic provides a sample of a Thermacore insulated steel door proposed for the four-bay garage behind 55 W. Market St. Copyright - © Ed Courrier Contractor Ben Maderic provides a sample of a Thermacore insulated steel door proposed for the four-bay garage behind 55 W. Market St. Copyright - © Ed Courrier

Board approves new signs, roofing

Tuesday, October 2, 2018 by Ed Courrier Special to the Bethlehem Press in Local News

Accompanied by sign maker David delos Stantos, SS 77 Hair Studio owner Selines Santiago was granted a certificate of appropriateness to recover an existing awning at her shop at 77 W. Broad St. The script style logo painted in silver on burgundy fabric was approved at the Sept. 5 meeting of the Historical and Architectural Review Board held in the Rotunda. A similar logo in silver, white or off white with a clear background for the storefront window was okayed. They were encouraged to post the hours of operation in vinyl block letters on the door. The red brick contemporary commercial building is owned by Faustina and Andrew Talago.

Another small business owner, Kofi Armah, received a COA for a 3-foot by 3-foot blade sign for his Ghanaian restaurant at 81 W. Broad St. The two-sided aluminum sign contains a large off white circle with the burgundy and yellow-orange flame-like logo above a rectangular panel with “COAL Lounge & Grill.” The signage was approved with the stipulation that a thin pinstripe be added to surround the images or words in each panel. Armah was accompanied by Jomana Hanna, who assisted with his application. The storefront structure is owned by Domenic Villani.

Stephen Pallone received approval to replace failing “ribbon slate” roofing with GAF Slateline shingles in “antique slate” color for the brick home he and his wife Karen own at 225 E. Wall St. Vice Chairman Philip Roeder explained to his fellow board members that “ribbon slate” is inferior to traditional slate roofing and is nearly impossible to repair. Pallone was advised to have the roofer reinstall the existing snow guards, and if the gutters are found to be deficient, replace them with half-round gutters. This was one of three buildings on Wall Street to come before the board that day.

The commission gave Will Carpenter permission to remove an unused, barely visible brick chimney at the two-unit row home he owns at 224 E. Wall St. Carpenter said this needed to be done before he could proceed with replacing the flat roof on the structure. After receiving advice from the board on appropriate materials to employ for the roof replacement, the applicant was told to return if he decided to install solar panels on it.

Wilfredo Ramos, representing his vacationing mom, real estate property manager Jenny Ramos, collected feedback from HARB for a proposal to replace wooden side stairs to a sunroom at the rear of 266 E. Wall St. The applicant was instructed to return with revised plans for a more historically appropriate balustrade instead of the modern-looking deck balustrade originally proposed. Ramos was told to provide additional information on the main house and addition, as well as photographs of neighboring buildings.

The property at the corner of Wall and Linden streets is owned by John Zawarski.

The board wrapped up the meeting with unanimous approval of proposed renovations for 55 W. Market St. Contractor Ben Maderic, representing property owner Donald Kaas, gained permission to remove two exterior doors and infill with brick that will be “toothed in” on the west side of the house. The stairs and railing leading to one of the doors and the lights above both will also be removed. All new brickwork is to be painted to match the color of the existing brick wall. A five-foot black aluminum fence for the west side of the property was approved.

Maderic received approval to change garage door material to a wood-look Thermacore insulated steel door from actual wood that had been previously approved in July. The contractor said the cost for four wood garage doors was beyond what the homeowner could afford. The overhead doors have a carriage house look. The applicant got permission to install half round gutters with smooth downspouts on the large detached garage behind the house.

The Historical and Architectural Review Board meets the first Wednesday of every month to review all exterior changes proposed to buildings in the historic district north of the Lehigh River. When a proposed project receives a certificate of appropriateness from the board, it must then be approved by city council.