Bethlehem Press

Wednesday, October 17, 2018
Young families were a major part of the audience at the 2018 Apple Days festival. Scott and Alexis Ferry of Palmer Township brought their children, Holden and Hayden, to enjoy the activities. Young families were a major part of the audience at the 2018 Apple Days festival. Scott and Alexis Ferry of Palmer Township brought their children, Holden and Hayden, to enjoy the activities.
A key stop on the way in and out of the Burnside Plantation was a booth for purchasing apple pies and apple strudel, as well as other apple-themed baked goods. Lindsay Jancay (right), the director of collections and exhibitions for Historic Bethlehem, staffs the booth with volunteer Felicity Doll. In a typical year they sell over 250 pies alone. The pies are made by Tombler’s bakery in Easton. A key stop on the way in and out of the Burnside Plantation was a booth for purchasing apple pies and apple strudel, as well as other apple-themed baked goods. Lindsay Jancay (right), the director of collections and exhibitions for Historic Bethlehem, staffs the booth with volunteer Felicity Doll. In a typical year they sell over 250 pies alone. The pies are made by Tombler’s bakery in Easton.
Boys chased girls, and girls made themselves scarce in a maze of hay bales. Stella Emershaw (right) of Bethlehem joins a friend in taking a break from the scramble. Nice to see that Stella is enjoying an apple. Boys chased girls, and girls made themselves scarce in a maze of hay bales. Stella Emershaw (right) of Bethlehem joins a friend in taking a break from the scramble. Nice to see that Stella is enjoying an apple.
Sarah and Lenora Kleiner of Buffalo, N.Y., who were visiting family in the Lehigh Valley, read a book to Abby, a therapy dog, while Abby’s trainer, Rich Hanner, listens in. Sarah and Lenora Kleiner of Buffalo, N.Y., who were visiting family in the Lehigh Valley, read a book to Abby, a therapy dog, while Abby’s trainer, Rich Hanner, listens in.
Emme Drago, a winner of the Lyons Fiddling Contest, entertains the crowd with popular tunes including “Stack of Barley” and “Westfalia Waltz.” Emme’s father accompanies her on guitar. Emme Drago, a winner of the Lyons Fiddling Contest, entertains the crowd with popular tunes including “Stack of Barley” and “Westfalia Waltz.” Emme’s father accompanies her on guitar.
“Whoa!” A well-meaning lad gets the surprise of his young life when a sheep wants to be fed, now. The petting zoo featured sheep, rabbits, a donkey and a goose with feathers that looked to be custom-designed for Broadway. “Whoa!” A well-meaning lad gets the surprise of his young life when a sheep wants to be fed, now. The petting zoo featured sheep, rabbits, a donkey and a goose with feathers that looked to be custom-designed for Broadway.
PRESS PHOTO BY DENNIS GLEWPurveyors of food and drink, which even included wine and hard cider, did a big business as lunch time arrived. A whole tent devoted to apple desserts (a la mode, if you liked) was filled with customers. PRESS PHOTO BY DENNIS GLEWPurveyors of food and drink, which even included wine and hard cider, did a big business as lunch time arrived. A whole tent devoted to apple desserts (a la mode, if you liked) was filled with customers.
Todd Gladfelter of New Ringgold, who advertises himself as a “chainsaw artist,” attracts attention through the unmistakeable whine of his chosen instrument. His subjects, largely taken from nature, include the bear on which he is working here as well as foxes, eagles, wolves, and even pigs. Surprised that art can be created with a chainsaw? Michelangelo used hammers and chisels. Todd Gladfelter of New Ringgold, who advertises himself as a “chainsaw artist,” attracts attention through the unmistakeable whine of his chosen instrument. His subjects, largely taken from nature, include the bear on which he is working here as well as foxes, eagles, wolves, and even pigs. Surprised that art can be created with a chainsaw? Michelangelo used hammers and chisels.
Spinning wool -- or in this case fiber, since it comes from alpacas -- by hand may no longer be common in the United States, but it still happens in many other places. Maggie Wright, the owner of Kraussdale Alpacas, discovered the technology during a trip to Machu Pichu, in Peru. Here she demonstrates to guests how a handful of fiber is turned into thread by a foot-powered spinning wheel. Spinning wool -- or in this case fiber, since it comes from alpacas -- by hand may no longer be common in the United States, but it still happens in many other places. Maggie Wright, the owner of Kraussdale Alpacas, discovered the technology during a trip to Machu Pichu, in Peru. Here she demonstrates to guests how a handful of fiber is turned into thread by a foot-powered spinning wheel.

Apple Days 2018 Everything apple ... except iPhones

Monday, October 8, 2018 by Dorothy Glew Special to the Bethlehem Press in Local News

To celebrate the arrival of the apple harvest and the beginning of fall, Historic Bethlehem Museum and Sites sponsored its fifth annual Apple Days festival in early September.

The Burnside Plantation, location of a colonial farm during Bethlehem’s earliest years, was the site of activities of all sorts that attracted a large audience. Kids crowded into the petting zoo and played in a small maze, many with their faces painted. Older guests listened to talks and demonstrations of early farm technology or enjoyed fiddlers who played traditional music.

There were also displays by tradespeople and merchants, artists and farmers. Master gardeners were available to consult about everything happening in the garden or yard. One pointed out several Monarch butterfly caterpillars crawling on milkweed plants.

The garden behind the Burnside Mansion was also available to visit.