Bethlehem Press

Saturday, February 16, 2019
PRESS PHOTOS BY DANA GRUBBStanding on the canal bed in an outline of a canal boat made from rope, volunteer Patti Brahler explains to a group of fourth grade students from Freemansburg ES the basic activities on a canal boat that carried coal. PRESS PHOTOS BY DANA GRUBBStanding on the canal bed in an outline of a canal boat made from rope, volunteer Patti Brahler explains to a group of fourth grade students from Freemansburg ES the basic activities on a canal boat that carried coal.
Sue Francisco coaches students on how to draw a mule. Sue Francisco coaches students on how to draw a mule.
Volunteer Steve Capwell demonstrates how a lock operates to move a canal boat from one level to the next in the waterway. Volunteer Steve Capwell demonstrates how a lock operates to move a canal boat from one level to the next in the waterway.
Freemansburg student Adrienne harnesses a mule inside the mule barn. Freemansburg student Adrienne harnesses a mule inside the mule barn.
Under volunteer Barbara Fritz’s supervision, student Laila learns to churn butter. Under volunteer Barbara Fritz’s supervision, student Laila learns to churn butter.
Evan shreds cabbage under guidance from ‘Alpha’ Santori. Tasting the end product sauerkraut, he said it was just “okay.” Evan shreds cabbage under guidance from ‘Alpha’ Santori. Tasting the end product sauerkraut, he said it was just “okay.”
Volunteer Jeffrey Zettlemoyer explains how a lock tender’s family needed to be self-sufficient by raising much of their food in a garden near the house in which they lived next to the canal lock. Volunteer Jeffrey Zettlemoyer explains how a lock tender’s family needed to be self-sufficient by raising much of their food in a garden near the house in which they lived next to the canal lock.

Learning about the locks

Tuesday, January 29, 2019 by Dana Grubb Special to the Bethlehem Press in School

Fourth grade students throughout the Bethlehem Area School District got some firsthand canal experience using the book “Tales of the Towpath,” which was written by canal education manager Dennis Scholl, for the curriculum.

Each class also visited the Freemansburg Canal Education Center on a class field trip. The story is told through the eyes of a 10-year-old and depicts life along the canal during the 18th Century.

Students from each elementary school learned how a grist mill works, how you fed your family as a lock tender, how locks work and what a canal boat was like. Students enjoyed interactive fun harnessing a mule, sketching a mule, churning butter and making horseradish.

Freemansburg ES students were among those participating and visited the canal education center during October. The sessions were sponsored by the Delaware and Lehigh National Heritage Corridor and the Old Freemansburg Association.