Bethlehem Press

Monday, September 16, 2019
press photos by ed courrierCBD American Shaman business owner Laura Penske and Chuck Longacre from City Sign Service present their signage proposal for 9 E. Third St. Copyright - © Ed Courrier press photos by ed courrierCBD American Shaman business owner Laura Penske and Chuck Longacre from City Sign Service present their signage proposal for 9 E. Third St. Copyright - © Ed Courrier
Representing T-Mobile, Donna Freshcoln of Acer Associates answers board questions about proposed antenna work for the top of the Fred B. Rooney Building at 4 East 4th St. Flanking her, from left, are Tony Silvoy and Roger Hudak. Copyright - © Ed Courrier Representing T-Mobile, Donna Freshcoln of Acer Associates answers board questions about proposed antenna work for the top of the Fred B. Rooney Building at 4 East 4th St. Flanking her, from left, are Tony Silvoy and Roger Hudak. Copyright - © Ed Courrier
Restaurateur Adriel Almonte, assisted by contractor Johnny Ramirez seek a COA for signage for his Casa de Campo Restaurant at 123 W. Fourth St. Copyright - © Ed Courrier Restaurateur Adriel Almonte, assisted by contractor Johnny Ramirez seek a COA for signage for his Casa de Campo Restaurant at 123 W. Fourth St. Copyright - © Ed Courrier
Evan Blose from Fastsigns seeks a COA for a sign proposal for New York Gyro at 129 E. Third St. Copyright - © Ed Courrier Evan Blose from Fastsigns seeks a COA for a sign proposal for New York Gyro at 129 E. Third St. Copyright - © Ed Courrier

Board approves Shaman signage

Monday, July 15, 2019 by Ed Courrier Special to the Bethlehem Press in Local News

CBD American Shaman at 9 E. Third St. was granted a certificate of appropriateness for signage during the Bethlehem Historic Conservation Commission June 17 meeting in the Rotunda. Representing the new retail franchise for hemp oil wellness products were owner Laura Penske and Chuck Longacre from City Sign Service. Dimensional aluminum serif lettering pin-mounted to the sign band measures approximately 217 inches across the façade over the entrance. Included, is a two-sided, 36-inch by 47-inch hanging sign with company name and feather logo on burgundy background.

Off-white vinyl signage for the storefront doors, transom, and windows contain a vinyl “etched” feather logo. Additional smaller sans serif font spelling out “Health,” Wellness,” Organic,” and “All Natural,” as well as store hours were approved.

Approval was granted with the following changes: The aluminum letters are to be pin-mounted to a an off-white backing board which includes a burgundy pinstripe. The bracket for the hanging sign must be more historically appropriate than the simple tube style presented. It was stipulated the applicants submit the revised design to historic officer Jeff Long.

CBD, short for Cannabidiol, is one of many cannabinoids found in the hemp plant. CBD is a non-psychoactive compound that is reported to have many therapeutic uses.

The one-story circa 1920 building is owned by Shale Road, LP.

T-Mobile, represented by Donna Freshcoln of Acer Associates, LLC and Mike Fahey from Velocitel received permission to replace three and add three additional antennas to the top of the Fred B. Rooney Building at 4 East 4th St. The contractors explained the new antennas will be smaller that those previously installed. They also were okayed for supporting equipment such as cables and cabinets. The board requested that all would be painted brown to match existing equipment, as long as it didn’t interfere with functionality.

The 14-story high-rise was completed in 1979 is owned by Bethlehem Developers of PA.

Evan Blose from Fastsigns, while representing New York Gyro, secured a COA for 129 E. Third St. His proposal for the installation of individual sans serif letters and a medallion to the wood façade of a sign board was approved as presented. The façade signage measures one foot by 10 feet and the various parts are rendered in off-white and red on a dark blue background. Blose is to maintain a two-inch distance from the building details above and below the sign. He will also relocate an existing conduit and resubmit the plans to Long for final review.

East Allen Rental owns the brick building that once housed George’s Light Lunch.

The commissioners tabled a signage proposal for a new eatery featuring Spanish cuisine for 123 W. Fourth St. Representing the Casa de Campo Restaurant were owner Adriel Almonte and contractor Johnny Ramirez. The application for a store front vinyl sign was considered incomplete and the board provided the applicants with guidelines so they could present a more detailed submission at a later date.

The residential over retail circa 1890 brick building, owned by Jose Nunez, was previously occupied by Golazo House.

Bruce Campbell sought advice on his rehab project for the two-and-a-half story building he owns at 601 E. Fourth St. The Happy Tap Bar had occupied the circa 1895 building and Campbell looks to remove the aluminum siding to expose and restore red brick walls and wood trim. He also requested permission to demolish the rear one-story garage built in 1940 to make way for outdoor dining. The garage had been heavily altered when it was converted into an apartment unit.

Campbell’s rendering of the project depicts the main building with the brick exposed and a back patio extending to the sidewalk behind it where the apartment is. Short stone columns support wrought-iron fencing with roofing over part of the dining area. The establishment would be renamed “The Nest.”

A COA was granted for the removal of the siding and restoration of the main building. Campbell will need to return with a more detailed proposal for the back of the property, incorporating board input, before the commissioners would permit demolition of the rear structure.

All voting on agenda items was unanimous.

The Bethlehem HCC is charged with the task of determining if new signs or other alterations to a building’s exterior would be an appropriate fit for the neighborhood in one of three designated historic districts. Hearings are regularly scheduled on the third Monday of the month.

Obtaining a certificate of appropriateness is only a first step for business owners and residents in a designated historic district who wish to make alterations to a building’s exterior. The BHCC’s recommendations are later reviewed, then voted on by city council before any project is allowed to proceed.