Bethlehem Press

Monday, September 16, 2019
press photos by ed courrierCADCB Director Anna Smith and Lynn Holden present awning proposals for Molly’s Irish Grille & Sports Pub at 8 E. Fourth St. Behind them, from left, are board members Roger Hudak and Gary Lader. Copyright - © Ed Courrier press photos by ed courrierCADCB Director Anna Smith and Lynn Holden present awning proposals for Molly’s Irish Grille & Sports Pub at 8 E. Fourth St. Behind them, from left, are board members Roger Hudak and Gary Lader. Copyright - © Ed Courrier
Colony Meadery owner Greg Heller-LaBelle answers questions about his signage proposal for his recently relocated business at 211 E. Third St. Copyright - © Ed Courrier Colony Meadery owner Greg Heller-LaBelle answers questions about his signage proposal for his recently relocated business at 211 E. Third St. Copyright - © Ed Courrier

Molly’s returns for awning approval

Tuesday, September 10, 2019 by Ed Courrier Special to the Bethlehem Press in Local News

Representing Molly’s Irish Grille & Sports Pub, Community Action Development Corporation of Bethlehem (CADCB) Director Anna Smith and Lynn Holden, who is representing Molly’s for CADBC’s facade grant program, received a certificate of appropriateness from the Bethlehem Historic Conservation Commission Aug. 19 for new awnings and an outdoor seating enclosure for 8, 12, and 20 East Fourth St. Holden had returned with more detailed information, as asked at a previous hearing.

The commissioners found the choice of black Sunbrella acrylic fabric appropriate and approved the 1-inch welded galvanized pipe as the awning framework with a height of 36 inches, a 12-inch drop, open ends, and a base extending 16 inches from the wall. The two new awnings are to match the structure of the existing awning on the front building façade.

The restaurant’s shamrock logo in an off-white is to be centered on each section of the existing 49-foot, 3-inch awning and new 50-foot, 6-inch awning adjacent to it. The new awning for the rear of 8 Fourth St. measures 27 feet, 4 inches long.

A 36-inch high enclosure between the brick piers of 20 East Fourth St. for outdoor seating under the building recess is to be of the same black fabric as the awning, stretched over galvanized pipe frames.

The upgrade is funded by a 50/50 CADCB grant, where the business owner is responsible for half the cost of the project.

The contemporary one-story commercial brick building is owned by WRC Rooney Limited Partnership. It was constructed in 1979.

Colony Meadery owner Greg Heller-LaBelle scored approval for proposed signage for his recently relocated business at 211 E. Third St. Heller-LaBelle provided board members with an additional drawing at the meeting, showing the proposed signs for the façade and windows to scale. The 6-foot by 32-inch black steel sign centered over the entry features cutouts of the company name with “Est. 2012” with a translucent vinyl panel attached to the back of it. The sign is designed to project outward and be back lit. A pinstripe surrounds the sign.

A two-sided blade sign, measuring 20 inches by 30 inches, is to project from the right corner of the façade on an existing bracket. Beth Starbuck noted the original logo’s cutout design would be read backward from the opposite side. She suggested that painting the logo on it would solve that problem. The applicant agreed to add a pin stripe around the painted logo.

Vinyl window and door signs featuring the company name, logo and hours in off white and frosted white were also approved.

Historic officer Jeff Long pointed out an inconsistency between the fonts making up the “C” for “Colony” in the submitted materials. One was plain while the other featured “bee’s wings.” Heller-LaBelle replied that he was looking to use the fancier font.

The circa 1920s one-story painted brick and stucco storefront with diamond shapes on its face is owned by 211 E. Third St. LLC. Colony Meadery was previously located inside the Moravian Book Shop, across the river.

All decisions were unanimous.

The Bethlehem HCC is charged with the task of determining if new signs or other alterations to a building’s exterior would be an appropriate fit for the neighborhood in one of three designated historic districts. Hearings are regularly scheduled on the third Monday of the month.

Obtaining a certificate of appropriateness is only a first step for business owners and residents in a designated historic district who wish to make alterations to a building’s exterior. The BHCC’s recommendations are later reviewed, then voted on by city council before any project is allowed to proceed.