Bethlehem Press

Wednesday, October 16, 2019
PRESS PHOTOS BY DENNIS GLEWA beautiful, cool day attracted many people to the Saturday opening of Apple Days. Guests wait patiently to pay the entrance fee. PRESS PHOTOS BY DENNIS GLEWA beautiful, cool day attracted many people to the Saturday opening of Apple Days. Guests wait patiently to pay the entrance fee.
Many families attended Apple Days, attracted by the activities for children. Ian and Morgan Dell said they were looking forward to the festival, but their kids – daughter Charlotte, asleep in her mother’s arms, and four-month-old twins, Lincoln and Colton – decided to take a nap. Many families attended Apple Days, attracted by the activities for children. Ian and Morgan Dell said they were looking forward to the festival, but their kids – daughter Charlotte, asleep in her mother’s arms, and four-month-old twins, Lincoln and Colton – decided to take a nap.
Jennifer Purcell, a naturalist from Wildlands Conservancy, thrilled a large audience of children with several unusual pets. Carolina the corn snake was a particular hit. Jennifer Purcell, a naturalist from Wildlands Conservancy, thrilled a large audience of children with several unusual pets. Carolina the corn snake was a particular hit.
Kim Miller of Hamburg brought her pet pig Harley to the festival. Harley does tricks – he’ll climb up on stairs, open a door on the top stair, then close it – provided Kim gives him treats. Kim Miller of Hamburg brought her pet pig Harley to the festival. Harley does tricks – he’ll climb up on stairs, open a door on the top stair, then close it – provided Kim gives him treats.
Bright red T-shirts identified the many Apple Days volunteers. Here the Hutchinson family -– dad and kids Elizabeth and Andrew – demonstrate an 1869 Buckeye apple press from Springfield, Ohio, which still makes cider as well as when it was new. Bright red T-shirts identified the many Apple Days volunteers. Here the Hutchinson family -– dad and kids Elizabeth and Andrew – demonstrate an 1869 Buckeye apple press from Springfield, Ohio, which still makes cider as well as when it was new.
7458. To contain the flying chips of wood, Todd Gladfelter of New Tripoli works in semi-enclosed area as he carves the head of a raccoon from a tree stump. Instead of hammer and chisels of various sorts, the tools of traditional sculptors, he works with a pair of chainsaws. 7458. To contain the flying chips of wood, Todd Gladfelter of New Tripoli works in semi-enclosed area as he carves the head of a raccoon from a tree stump. Instead of hammer and chisels of various sorts, the tools of traditional sculptors, he works with a pair of chainsaws.
PRESS PHOTOS BY DENNIS GLEWVolunteer Barbara Hollenbach tempts a passerby with a beautiful slice of apple pie. In addition to assisting at Apple Days, Hollenbach is the chair of the board of trustees of Historic Bethlehem Museums and Sites, the festival’s sponsor. PRESS PHOTOS BY DENNIS GLEWVolunteer Barbara Hollenbach tempts a passerby with a beautiful slice of apple pie. In addition to assisting at Apple Days, Hollenbach is the chair of the board of trustees of Historic Bethlehem Museums and Sites, the festival’s sponsor.
7502. A very popular attraction at Apple Days was a wagon ride for children drawn by two miniature donkeys, Cecely and Jojo, managed by Ben Gress. Milo and Liam Koval of Bangor were a little nervous about their outing, so their mom accompanied them. All went beautifully. 7502. A very popular attraction at Apple Days was a wagon ride for children drawn by two miniature donkeys, Cecely and Jojo, managed by Ben Gress. Milo and Liam Koval of Bangor were a little nervous about their outing, so their mom accompanied them. All went beautifully.

Something for young and older

Tuesday, September 17, 2019 by dorothy glew Special to the Bethlehem Press in Local News

Apple Days 2019

Small wonder that the sixth annual Apple Days Sept. 6 and 7 at Bethlehem’s Burnside Plantation was teeming with children. There were so many fun and interesting things to see and do.

In one tent, Jennifer Purcell invited children (and adults) not just to see, but to pet, if they wished, a skunk named Cabbage, a corn snake named Carolina, and a barn owl named Tyto. At another venue, Pat Belliel introduced Harley, her 5-year-old pet pig. At yet another venue there were sheep, alpacas and a pair of 22-year-old miniature donkeys.

Children could take a ride on a pony or in a donkey-drawn wagon. There was also face painting and apple bobbing.

For older visitors, there was a chainsaw carving demonstration, a donut-eating contest, a beekeeper presentation, a culinary competition and a weaving demonstration, to name a few attractions. A variety of refreshments were available, including, appropriately, assorted apple treats.

More photos appear on page A2.