Bethlehem Press

Thursday, November 21, 2019
PRESS PHOTOS BY ED COURRIERAt right, Sandra Freeman discusses proposed signage for Your CBD Store at 14 W. Fourth St. From left are commissioners Jeff Long, Philip Roeder, Seth Cornish and Craig Evans. Copyright - © Ed Courrier PRESS PHOTOS BY ED COURRIERAt right, Sandra Freeman discusses proposed signage for Your CBD Store at 14 W. Fourth St. From left are commissioners Jeff Long, Philip Roeder, Seth Cornish and Craig Evans. Copyright - © Ed Courrier
Bethlehem Parking Authority operation manager Jeremy Alleshouse describes how the city is bringing continuity to its wayfindings signs with his signage proposal for the New Street garage. Copyright - © Ed Courrier Bethlehem Parking Authority operation manager Jeremy Alleshouse describes how the city is bringing continuity to its wayfindings signs with his signage proposal for the New Street garage. Copyright - © Ed Courrier
Larry Eighmy, second from left, requests revisions to the façade of the building he owns at 327 Broadway. He is assisted by, from left, Josh Divers and Jordan Serulneck from Seven Sirens Brewing Company, and Theresa Duncan from The Stone House Group. Copyright - © Ed Courrier Larry Eighmy, second from left, requests revisions to the façade of the building he owns at 327 Broadway. He is assisted by, from left, Josh Divers and Jordan Serulneck from Seven Sirens Brewing Company, and Theresa Duncan from The Stone House Group. Copyright - © Ed Courrier
From left, contractor Matida Kurek and project manager Brian Bozilesky from Post Road Management seek approval for façade renovation work for 712, 714 and 716 E. Fourth St. Copyright - © Ed Courrier From left, contractor Matida Kurek and project manager Brian Bozilesky from Post Road Management seek approval for façade renovation work for 712, 714 and 716 E. Fourth St. Copyright - © Ed Courrier
From left, Rick Cantelmi, accompanied by architect Christine Ussler, applies for a COA for façade work on a building he owns at 505 E. Fourth St. Copyright - © Ed Courrier From left, Rick Cantelmi, accompanied by architect Christine Ussler, applies for a COA for façade work on a building he owns at 505 E. Fourth St. Copyright - © Ed Courrier

4th St. CBD store to get new signage

Tuesday, November 5, 2019 by Ed Courrier Special to the Bethlehem Press in Local News

Business owner Sandra Freeman was granted a certificate of appropriateness from the Bethlehem Historic Conservation Commission for signage for Your CBD Store at 14 W. Fourth St. at the Oct. 21 meeting held in the Rotunda. Her 101-inch by 22-inch refaced sign above the entrance features a colorful mandala-like cannabis bud logo adjacent to the name of her establishment in gold serif lettering and a gold double pinstripe over black. A smaller version of the bud logo over the store name in vinyl are in the shop windows flanking the entrance.

The Queen Anne style building is owned by Linda Villani.

Representing the Bethlehem Parking Authority, Operation Manager Jeremy Alleshouse received the green light from HCC for new wayfinding signage for the city’s parking garage at 324 S. New St.

Alleshouse explained the new parking signs are part of a citywide program to achieve continuity with municipal signage. The red, blue and white style of the streamlined signs would incorporate the “circular ‘P’,” the universal symbol for public parking, and feature a long tapered edge at the bottom of the new rectangular design for the New Street facility.

The board stipulated that signs should be installed in the mortar joints of the modern structure. They recommended the city should choose whether to spell out “street” as it appears in the horizontal main entrance sign facing New Street or abbreviate it, as presented for the adjacent two-sided vertical blade sign.

Lawrence Eighmy, accompanied by Theresa Duncan from The Stone House Group., and tenants Jordan Serulneck and Josh Divers from Seven Sirens Brewing Company, was given permission for new windows and framing for a rooftop structure for 327 Broadway. This has been an ongoing project to convert a parking garage into a brewery and other uses. The front of the structure faces Broadway and its rear faces W. Fourth Street.

Eighmy explained that he pivoted from the previously permitted storefront system for the West Fourth Street. façade when workmen exposed the original decorative brick and stonework of the second floor. It had been long concealed under layers of other construction materials. The windows for the upper story installed in each of five openings were approved pending applied muntins being added to the glass to create a divided-light look.

Craig Evans criticized the applicants when informed that installation of windows on the building and framing for a rooftop addition to connect two stair towers were underway ahead of the proposal review. “This just sticks in my craw that this happens,” he said.

Permission was granted for shortening the third floor windows on the west elevation of the structure, pending a cut sheet being submitted to the historic officer.

Proposed windows and overhead garage door for the ground floor were considered by the commission as too modern to work with the older look of the recently exposed second floor.

The applicants were encouraged to return with alterations to their proposed ground floor windows and overhead garage door, as well as a more appropriate cladding proposal for the rooftop structure, guard rail and other details.

The property is owned by Eighmy through Sycamore Hill Farm Development. “That building is a gem, and you guys are doing a great job,” said committee member Roger Hudak after the vote.

The board approved a stucco finish and commercial grade dark bronze doors and store windows with sills and gooseneck light fixtures for 712, 714, and 716 E. Fourth St. Representing the residential over retail brick building were project manager Brian Bozilesky from Post Road Management and contractor Matida Kurek.

The applicants were advised to remove the “stacked stone” veneer they had installed along the foundation and replace it with a sand finish stucco coating similar to what is found on the other walls of the building. Approval for the proposal was granted pending their submitting a color sample to Historic Officer Jeff Long and Chairman Philip Roeder for the stucco and measurements for the three lights.

Architect Christine Ussler from Artefact, Inc. helped Rick Cantelmi score a COA for façade renovations to a property he owns at 505 E. Fourth St. Approval was granted for removing infill of two existing windows from the two-and-a-half story residential over commercial building and replacing them with fiberglass-clad Andersen double-hung wood windows. The applicants explained they were chosen to match existing windows on the building.

Approval was granted for other renovations, including removing deteriorating imitation brick siding to expose the wood clapboards underneath, stripping paint off painted-over transom windows, and repairing a decorative cornice over the door leading to apartments on the upper floors. The applicants plan to replicate that cornice and install it over the main entrance to the business as well. Cut sheets were requested for the proposed replacement doors and storm windows to be sent to the historic officer.

Voting on all agenda items was unanimous.

The Bethlehem HCC is charged with the task of determining if new signs or other alterations to a building’s exterior would be an appropriate fit for the neighborhood in one of three designated historic districts. Hearings are regularly scheduled on the third Monday of the month at city hall.

Obtaining a certificate of appropriateness is only a first step for business owners and residents in a designated historic district who wish to make alterations to a building’s exterior. The commission’s recommendations are later reviewed, then voted on by council before any project is allowed to proceed.