Bethlehem Press

Tuesday, December 10, 2019
ArtsQuest Executive Director Jane George talks with guests Linda Anthony and Lindsay Woodruff after the awards ceremony. Anthony accepted the Pinnacle of the Arts Award for news photographer Carol Guzy, who was not able to attend the event because she was on assignment in Syria. Woodruff is a photography teacher at Moravian Academy. ArtsQuest Executive Director Jane George talks with guests Linda Anthony and Lindsay Woodruff after the awards ceremony. Anthony accepted the Pinnacle of the Arts Award for news photographer Carol Guzy, who was not able to attend the event because she was on assignment in Syria. Woodruff is a photography teacher at Moravian Academy.
4920(2)jpg—[The Linny Awards sign] 4920(2)jpg—[The Linny Awards sign]
Allentown native Alex Meixner, the Linny-Award-winning Performer of the Year, entertained the crowd at the awards ceremony with his signature instrument the accordion, which he was taught to play by his mother when he was just a child. The Grammy nominated musician has performed on more than 50 albums, and he and his band have played at major fairs and festivals across the country, including Allentown native Alex Meixner, the Linny-Award-winning Performer of the Year, entertained the crowd at the awards ceremony with his signature instrument the accordion, which he was taught to play by his mother when he was just a child. The Grammy nominated musician has performed on more than 50 albums, and he and his band have played at major fairs and festivals across the country, including
Emerging Artist of the Year Arturo Cabrera posed with a portrait he painted of a friend from the Charter School for the Arts. Cabrera said he chose her as a subject because she was a dancer and knew how to create the angles with her body that he wanted. Emerging Artist of the Year Arturo Cabrera posed with a portrait he painted of a friend from the Charter School for the Arts. Cabrera said he chose her as a subject because she was a dancer and knew how to create the angles with her body that he wanted.
Arts Educator of the Year Amy Potlock was presented with her Linny Award by State Rep. Steve Samuelson. Beall Fowler was also on hand to congratulate Potlock. Arts Educator of the Year Amy Potlock was presented with her Linny Award by State Rep. Steve Samuelson. Beall Fowler was also on hand to congratulate Potlock.
Denise Parker, vocal music director at Northeast, conducted the singers during their performance. With her is Adam Stoltz, instrumental music director at Broughal Middle School, and David Beck from Northeast, who accompanied the singers on the piano. Denise Parker, vocal music director at Northeast, conducted the singers during their performance. With her is Adam Stoltz, instrumental music director at Broughal Middle School, and David Beck from Northeast, who accompanied the singers on the piano.
Broughal and Northeast Select Singers performed twice during the evening at the Linny Awards, receiving a very enthusiastic standing ovation. The ensemble sang “O Sifuni Mungo” (All Creatures of Our God and King). and “This Is Me” from the motion picture “The Greatest Showman.” Broughal and Northeast Select Singers performed twice during the evening at the Linny Awards, receiving a very enthusiastic standing ovation. The ensemble sang “O Sifuni Mungo” (All Creatures of Our God and King). and “This Is Me” from the motion picture “The Greatest Showman.”
State Senator Lisa Boscola is flanked on her left by Joe Uliana of J.M. Uliana and Associates, and on the right by Northampton County Councilman Kevin Lopp. She attended the ArtsQuest event to present state senate citations to all the Linny Award winners. State Senator Lisa Boscola is flanked on her left by Joe Uliana of J.M. Uliana and Associates, and on the right by Northampton County Councilman Kevin Lopp. She attended the ArtsQuest event to present state senate citations to all the Linny Award winners.
Purchasers of Linny bracelets and pins got to choose their own beads from a colorful selection. Each bead purchased increased the chances of winning the first prize of two Premier Tickets to “Hello Dolly” at the Academy of Music. Purchasers of Linny bracelets and pins got to choose their own beads from a colorful selection. Each bead purchased increased the chances of winning the first prize of two Premier Tickets to “Hello Dolly” at the Academy of Music.
Amber Galdanez of Bethlehem, and Alicia Rohrbach, Allentown, were helping create Linny bracelets and pins that were sold at the Linny Awards as a fundraiser for the ArtsQuest Foundation. Purchasers of the beads were given a chance to win one of three valuable prizes at the end of the evening. Amber Galdanez of Bethlehem, and Alicia Rohrbach, Allentown, were helping create Linny bracelets and pins that were sold at the Linny Awards as a fundraiser for the ArtsQuest Foundation. Purchasers of the beads were given a chance to win one of three valuable prizes at the end of the evening.
PRESS PHOTOS BY CAROLE GORNEYThese hand-crafted glass figurines, with their joyful outstretched arms and flashes of color, are given out each year to Linny Award winners. They are considered to be visual reflections of the spirit of Linny Fowler, a tireless supporter of the arts in whose memory the annual awards ceremony is held. The award was created by Dan Getz, the lead gaffer at the ArtsQuest PRESS PHOTOS BY CAROLE GORNEYThese hand-crafted glass figurines, with their joyful outstretched arms and flashes of color, are given out each year to Linny Award winners. They are considered to be visual reflections of the spirit of Linny Fowler, a tireless supporter of the arts in whose memory the annual awards ceremony is held. The award was created by Dan Getz, the lead gaffer at the ArtsQuest

ANNUAL LINNY AWARDS Honoring community giving

Monday, November 25, 2019 by Carole Gorney Special to the Bethlehem Press in Local News

ArtsQuest’s fourth annual Linny Awards got off to a rousing start with the announcement that in 2019 the ArtsQuest Foundation received a $5 million anonymous gift, the largest in the nonprofit’s history. The announcement was made by foundation CEO Jane George, who added that there were also two anonymous $1 million donations to the endowment.

George said that because of the community’s generosity this year, 6,000 students enjoyed field trips and performance at the Banana Factory and SteelStacks, while more than 772 educational classes and programs were held, with 97 percent of them free of charge.

There were also new and expanded community programs, according to George, that brought more than 2 million people to Bethlehem from 45 states and 35 countries.

After the CEO’s remarks, Linny Awards were presented in 11 categories, including volunteerism, philanthropy, visual arts, musical performance and education.

Heading up the winners was Carol Guzy, who won the Pinnacle of the Arts Award for her work as a news photographer covering political turmoil and disaster all over the world. She has won four Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other journalist. The focus of her work is to document the hope and compassion that exist during times of crisis.

Guzy won her first Pulitzer in 1986 covering the mudslides in Columbia, and her fourth in 2011 for documenting the Haitian earthquake. Guzy has been named Photographer of the Year eight times by the White House News Photographers Association, and three times by the National Press Photographers Association.

The Visual Artist of the Year is Kim Hogan, who creates her award-winning mosaic art in her studio on the third floor of the Banana Factory. Educated at New York City’s School of Visual Arts, her work is in private collections, including St. Luke’s University Health Network, Lehigh Valley Hospital and the Sigal Museum in Easton.

An article in “Style” magazine by Steve Piccione a few years ago described Hogan’s art as “a frictionless combination of fantasy, nature and modernity. Her exquisite, joyful compositions convey a childlike wonder and sophistication that seduces and inspires viewers of all ages.

Hogan is currently teaching healing arts workshops to family members affected by cancer.

On the music front, Grammy-nominated musician Alex Meixner was named Performer of the Year for his work that symbolizes excellence in its field. Classically trained, but noted for his versatility in various music genres, Meixner is renowned for his advocacy of polka music and teaching of the cultural connections among various ethnic music and instruments.

Meixner’s mother taught him to play the accordion, and he made his stage debut at age six. He and his band have played in most of the major festivals and fairs in the country, including Musikfest. He is co-founder of Pennsylvania’s Music Preservation Society, and spearheads the annual Great Pennsylvania Music Arts Celebration at the Allentown Fairgrounds on Memorial Day Weekend.

The Linny Committees’ Choice Award went this year to Ricardo Viera, for his lifetime promotion of the arts. Director and chief curator of Lehigh University’s Art Gallery Museum for 45 years, he established a visual laboratory and teaching collection program, as well as a nationally recognized collection of Latino and Latin American photography and video.

A noted lecturer, portfolio reviewer and government consultant for arts and cultural agencies, Viera recently retired to Miami.

The Arts Educator of the Year is Amy Putlock, who for the past eight years has been vocal and general music teacher, choir director and theater co-director at Bethlehem’s Broughal MS. Before her regular teaching day begins, she directs the Broughal Choir and Southside singers. After her classes, Putlock stays after school to work with the student theater and dance troupe.

A husband and wife team received the Philanthropy in the Arts Award. Robert and Cindy Oster were recognized for their ongoing service with multiple community organizations. When Robert Oster was CEO of Concannon Miller he made community involvement a company-wide priority. After his retirement, he dedicated himself to serving as president of the Minsi Trail Boy Scouts of America, as a board member of the St. Luke’s University Health Network and the Northampton Community College Foundation.

Cindy Oster has been a long-term Musikfest volunteer, and an active member of the Junior League of the Lehigh Valley, as well as a number of other community projects.

The Lifetime Achievement Award in Volunteerism went to St. Luke’s University Health Network’s Associate Vice President for Marketing and Public Relations David Yanoshik.

A lifelong valley resident, Yanoshik has been active in many community organizations, including ArtsQuest, The United Way, Discover Lehigh Valley and the Weller Health Education Center.

In 2015, he received the Weller Center’s Outstanding Friend to Kids Award.

Just Born Quality Confections was recognized as the Business Supporter of the Arts for its long years of support of the arts through grants, product donations, encouragement of employee volunteerism and service on local boards and committees. Among the programs it supports are those that make the arts more accessible and inclusive, such as the SATORI music and arts program in Bethlehem area schools.

The Emerging Artist of the Year award went to Arturo Cabrera, whose portraits are meant to capture the subtle nuances of what it means to be human. A 2012 graduate of the Charter School for the Arts in Bethlehem, he had a solo exhibition entitled “Humanism II” last Fall at the Dacia Gallery in New York City.

Cabrera’s paintings[, which incorporate gold, silver and copper leaf representing an aspect of humanity,] are featured in private collections in both America and Europe.

The $2,500 Student Scholarship Award, went to LS School graduate Fatima Montero, who currently is majoring in illustration at Moore College of Art and Design in Philadelphia. Montero hopes to become a children’s book illustrator.

ArtsQuest announced a new $1,000 annual scholarship award funded by a $25,000 donation from friends of the late John DiFrancesca. The scholarship goes to a student in the ArtSmart program to support students interested in attending summer arts camps or advanced arts classes.

This year’s scholarship recipient is 12-year-old Broughal Middle School student Serene Canty. She has been in the ArtSmart progam since 2018, and wants eventually to earn her living drawing anime, hand-drawn and computer animation originating from or associated with Japan.