Bethlehem Press

Thursday, April 26, 2018

Healthy Geezer: Three questions

Thursday, April 19, 2018 by FRED CICETTI in Focus

Q. What percentage of older men have erectile dysfunction (ED)?

The incidence of ED increases with age. Between 15 and 25 percent of 65-year-old men experience this problem. In older men, ED usually has a physical cause, such as a drug side effect, disease or injury. Anything that damages the nerves or impairs blood flow in the penis can cause ED.

The following are some leading causes of erectile dysfunction: diabetes, high blood pressure, atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), prostate surgery, hormone imbalance, alcohol and drug abuse.

Healthy Geezer: stuttering

Thursday, April 12, 2018 by FRED CICETTI in Focus

Q. My four-year-old grandson has begun to stutter. It upsets me and I don’t know how to handle it.

It should be reassuring to you to know that about five percent of children stutter for a period of about six months. Three-quarters of these children recover before they mature. About one percent of adults stutter.

Meanwhile, knowing how to talk to your grandson will help both of you.

Healthy Geezer: Here comes the sun

Friday, April 6, 2018 by FRED CICETTI in Focus

Second of two parts

Most public health messages have focused on the hazards of too much sun exposure. But there is some sunny news about the sun.

Sunlight increases the body’s vitamin D supply. In seniors, vitamin D protects against osteoporosis, a disorder in which the bones become increasingly brittle. Vitamin D also protects against cancer, heart disease, and other maladies.

There are other benefits a daily dose of sunlight.

Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a form of depression that affects people when they don’t get enough sunlight.

Sunny news about sunlight

Friday, March 30, 2018 by FRED CICETTI in Focus

First of two parts

Q. All I ever hear about the sun is how dangerous it is. But, when I was a child, my mother used to tell me to get out in the sun and play. Did my mother give me bad advice?

Most public-health messages focus on the hazards of too much sun exposure. Ultraviolet (UV) rays, an invisible component of sunlight, can cause skin damage, cataracts, wrinkles, age spots, and skin cancer.

But there is some sunny news about the sun.

Healthy Geezer: Three questions

Friday, March 23, 2018 by FRED CICETTI in Focus

Q. What is white-coat syndrome?

If you suffer from white-coat syndrome, your blood pressure jumps as soon as a doctor or nurse approaches you. If your doctor knows this, he or she may recommend a home blood-pressure monitor or ambulatory monitor that is worn around the clock and takes your pressure every 30 minutes.

Blood pressure tends to spike when you are excited by an emotion such as anger or fear. But high blood pressure, known as hypertension, is very sneaky. It’s called the silent killer because it usually has no symptoms.

Healthy Geezer: warts and all

Thursday, March 15, 2018 by FRED CICETTI in Focus

Q. Can you get rid of warts with duct tape?

For starters, check with your doctor before beginning any self-treatment for warts. You might mistake another kind of skin growth for a wart and hurt yourself.

The jury is still out on duct-tape therapy for warts. A recent study showed that duct tape wiped out more warts than conventional freezing did. In this study, warts were covered with duct tape for six days. Then, the warts were soaked in warm water and rubbed with an abrasive such as pumice stone. The treatment was repeated for as long as two months.

Healthy Geezer: The Plague

Friday, March 9, 2018 by FRED CICETTI in Focus

Q. Does the plague still exist?

In the 1300s, the Black Death, as the plague was called, killed about one-third of the people in Europe. A combination of antibiotics and improved living conditions have made the plague rare today.

Plague is found throughout the world, except for Australia. The greatest number of human plague infections occurs in African countries. However, the largest concentration of infected animals is in the United States and in the former Soviet Union.

Healthy: ginger

Thursday, February 22, 2018 by FRED CICETTI in Focus

Q. Is ginger really good for nausea or is this an old wive’s tale?

Ginger is an underground stem that is beige, thick and knotted. The stem extends roughly one foot above ground with long, narrow, ribbed, green leaves, and white or yellowish-green flowers. The underground stems of the ginger plant are used for cooking and medicinal purposes. In Asia, ginger is used to treat stomachaches, nausea, and diarrhea. Ginger extract is found in many dietary supplements sold in the United States for digestive ailments.

Healthy Geezer: Myasthenia gravis

Thursday, February 15, 2018 by FRED CICETTI in Focus

Q. My brother-in-law was diagnosed with myasthenia gravis. Could you do one of your columns on this subject so everyone in our family can understand it?

Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a muscle disease. The name comes from Greek and Latin words meaning grave muscle weakness. Myasthenia gravis (my-us-theen-ee-uh-grav-us) affects the muscles that control the eyes, face, breathing, chewing, talking, swallowing and limbs.

MG was first described in detail in the late 19th century, when the outlook for patients was bleak. Many died of respiratory failure.