Bethlehem Press

Wednesday, August 23, 2017

Article By: The Press

Tuesday, December 27, 2016 by The Press in Opinion

Dear Editor:

I am writing in support of “‘Hey, hey! Ho, ho! Fossil fuels have got to go!’” On November 15, Lehigh students gathered with residents of the Lehigh Valley to protest the Dakota Access Pipeline. Less than a month later, the US Army Corps of Engineers has denied approval of the pipeline that would have crossed under Lake Oahe in North Dakota, cutting through sacred burial grounds and establishing a potential contamination hazard. This is a major victory for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and all those who have stood in solidarity with them during the protest.

A Lehigh student’s thoughts on Standing Rock

Tuesday, December 20, 2016 by The Press in Opinion

I am writing in support of “‘Hey, hey! Ho, ho! Fossil fuels have got to go!’” On November 15, Lehigh students gathered with residents of the Lehigh Valley to protest the Dakota Access Pipeline. Less than a month later, the US Army Corps of Engineers has denied approval of the pipeline that would have crossed under Lake Oahe in North Dakota, cutting through sacred burial grounds and establishing a potential contamination hazard. This is a major victory for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and all those who have stood in solidarity with them during the protest.

Moravian speaker offers

Tuesday, December 20, 2016 by DOROTHY GLEW in Opinion

Reflections

This year Moravian College’s Cohen Arts and Lecture speaker, Jeffrey Toobin, was both informative and entertaining. Toobin is a graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Law School.

In the course of his legal career, Toobin served as Assistant U.S. Attorney in Brooklyn. In 1993 he gave up practicing law and took up journalism. He is now a legal analyst for CNN and staff writer at The New Yorker. He is also the bestselling author of seven books, the most recent of which is “American Heiress,” about Patty Hearst.

Article By: The Press

Tuesday, December 13, 2016 by The Press in Opinion

Recently, I discovered history in a packet of letters my mother had kept since World War II. The timing was perfect. Just when our nation’s brave men and women who served in the military were being honored and celebrated on Veterans Day, I was immersed in the innocent musings of a young soldier who paid the ultimate price for his service.

Robert was killed in action in France at the age of 22. He and I share DNA. He was an uncle I never got to meet.